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and use tax laws and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president, i would object to any further proceedings in regard to this bill. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, today this august body will honor the memory of 20 first-grade children, little babies who were gunned down, most of them shot multiple times. we will also honor the teachers and administrators who were killed that day in newtown, connecticut. but we're also going to honor with this legislation tens of thousands of others who were killed by guns each year here in america. we're going to do that by voting on a number of measures to strengthen the laws to prevent gun violence in this nation. mr. president, the families of innocents killed in newtown, aurora, in carson city, blacksburg, in oak creek and columbine really deserve these votes. where do i stand on these democratic proposals? this afternoon the senate will vote on a compromised background check proposal crafted by senators manchin, toomey, kirk and schumer, all experienced l
. ratified by the senate or the law of the land. and it sounds to me like one of the punchlines of your account, even though washington powers did grow, he did have a republican understanding, which required him to be very attentive to the commitments that were made by the nation. in the 1770s, we were not in position to make international commitments, but we did it with didn't have a lot of statutes on the book, but we have resolutions. would you not say when it washingtons experiences the commander-in-chief has a constitutional obligation to take seriously the commitment the nation has made in conventions like the geneva convention. .. >> i think it's important for the commander-in-chief to be looking at commitments that we make. >> others? more questions? speeches? opinions about canada? [laughter] >> [inaudible]. >> the former dean wants to make a speech about her youth. [laughter] >> i spent many summers canoeing in canada and singing every morning oh, candidate, which is beautiful. for that reason i made a point in junior high school of studying the history of canada, and why i ha
with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
the safeguards around the facilities. i was successful in putting those laws on the books that protect us today. >> all right, sir. thank you. rebuttal? >> that is not what your record indicates, ed. when you look at the port security bill you voted no. when you look at the homeland security bill, i had $158 million in an amendment to fund real security. tonight, we're hearing about threats on rail security coming in from canada, you voted no on that. you voted no for funding for homeland security. some of these votes there are 415 members, both sides are voting yes and you are voting no. >> you mentioned a couple. go ahead mr. markey. >> i am the author of the legislation to mare sure that rail security is more secure in our country. i'm the author of the legislation that moves towards enensuring that chemical plants, for example, are more protected within our country. look it, on our two records, i think we both try our best to work hard. my priorities wound up being the law of the united states in honor to protect the security of our country. >> go ahead. >> you voted no. you voted no on the
internal administrative restriction we all have given through congress. i don't know what the law is. >> we will make a request on that. and appreciate your follow-up on it. we go now to karen bass of california. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to congratulate secretary kerry on your appointment and also join my colleagues in expressing my condolences. i look forward to working with you and especially working with the committed women and men at the state department. i have to tell you that i have really enjoyed working directly with the state department and i'm honored to have an excellent pearson fellow in my office who i am looking forward to continue to work with me. as the ranking member of the africa subcommittee, i wanted to share with you several priority issues i hope you'll consider. first of all u.s.-africa trade relations. number two, the importance of development assistance programs, including global hiv-aids funding through pet far. and number three, support for peacekeeping operation. as you know the u.n. is considering establishing a peacekeeping isce in mali, and there al
will prosecute this terrorist through our civil system of justice. underu.s. law, the united states citizens can not be tried rather in military commissions. martha: but house armed services commission buck mckeown argues that the white house should reconsider. he says, quote, it seems premature to declare that we will not treat tsarnaev as an enemy combatant since we don't know about his affiliations. clearly american citizens must be tried to civilian court, but the same citizen viciously attacked his countrymen, should be exploited for his intelligence value before any trial begins. that will be a debate that rages on for some time on this issue. we'll talk more later in the show with former new york city mayor rudy giuliani. bill: looking forward to that coming up here. meanwhile the feds want to talk to the widow of the suspect, tamerlan. she is mother of 3-year-old daughter between the two. the her lawyer said talks are underway with the feds how to proceed with that. he revealed on the last day tamerlan was home when his wife left for work. martha: well the officers who capturedded dzhokh
is cooperating. >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. as a mother, a sister, a daughter, a wife, katy deeply mourns the pain and loss to innocent victims. >> shepard: we're learning more about her husband's trip to russia and whether it set off alarm bells in the united states. >> the hearing this morning created more confusion over the fbi's handling of tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011 and which federal agency new about his trip the following 'er to russia. >> was your department aware of his travels to russia, and if you weren't, the reason. >> the travel in 2012 you're referring to, yes, the system pinged when he was leaving the united states. by the time he returned, all investigations had been -- the matter had been closed. >> but napolitano's statements chronic with what assistant fbi briefed another lawmaker who is a member of the judiciary committee. >> the fbi told me they had no knowledge of him leaving or coming back. the name was misspelled so i would like to talk to you more about this case. how this man left. where he went, a
is still trying to establish a clear motive behind last monday's marathon bombing. law enforcement says that it appears dzhokhar and his older brother tamerlan was by i ideology. chilling new details in a ten-page fbi affidavit. a few minutes after the surveillance video captured the brothers at the marathon they split up according to court documents. tarrer lan heads to the finish line as his younger brother blends in with the crowd. dzhokhar places his backpack on the ground. at 2:50 the first bomb explodes. according to the affidavit, virtually every head turns, stares in that direction in apparent bewilderment and alarm, dzhokhar appears calm walk as way without his backpack seconds later, it detonates in the exact spot where he was landing. during thursday's getaway, one of the brothers bragged, did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. and dzhokhar's roomdartmouth, key evidence. a black jacket andhat. matching the clothing he was wearing at the scene. law enforcement sources say there are clear signs that tamerlan, the older brother, had become incr
and therefore the younger brother is going to be able to relay that to law enforcement or are they going to continue these sort of dark patches where we have questions that will never be answered. >> last about the latest incident. two men in canada that apparently wanted to derail a train from canada probably headed to the u.s. they are identified as having support from al qaeda in iran. >> right. >> a lot of threads here. do they make sense to you? >> they don't make sense to me. that doesn't mean they aren't true. but as we've learned this week. as we've learned in the past, we should always be cautious about the early reports. one thing the canadian mounted police said there is no state sponsor. even if there is an al qaeda link it's not iran supporting attack. and it makes no sense what iran is doing. we're in negotiations. they're about to have a presidential campaign. this is not the way iran tens to operate. of course al qaeda and injury. she vows to dance again and run in the boston marathon. this is what she had to say to cnn's anderson cooper. >> i landed and was -- sort of cl
for intelligence, not law enforcement purposes. this is highly controversial and could affect the government's case. but at some point in that interrogation which only lasted a few hours, which apparently consisted of him writing answers because he can't speak due to the injury to his throat. at some point in that interrogation, agents, professional interrogators decided we're not going to get anywhere or we've already learned everything we can learn from him. they also have on their shoulder, breathing down their neck, so to speak, a federal rule of procedure which requires he be charged with something within 48 hours. otherwise they have to let him go. they did charge him with this complaint filed by an f.b.i. agent who basically wrote a ten-page affidavit summarizing the evidence that they have against him. this f.b.i. agent personally viewed the tapes, looked at the evidence, -- >>gretchen: basically he's charged with having a weapon of mass destruction and killing people. but there was so much controversy in the last couple of days about whether or not he should be an enemy combatant. senator
hill later today, when law enforcement officials brief lawmakers. john? >> all right, barbara starr, thanks so much. barbara starr in washington. i want to bring back fran townsend, cnn analyst, former homeland security adviser to president george w. bush. and fran, i want to get your take here. where do you think the investigation stands right now? we've had these initial criminal complaints given dzhokhar tsarnaev. we've seen sort of the case laid out just a little bit. but how about the investigation itself? what are the next steps? >> well, first of all, we know from investigators that they're cooperating with the russians. i talked to sources, federal sources, and the cooperation between russian authorities and the fbi is quite good. both want to understand what they might have missed, what they should have seen, and what they should have made of it as this case is unfolding. you know, there are questions about the older brother tamerlan's travels to russia, what he did and who he met with. those are the sorts of questions that are following up. in the meantime, here in the uni
. back here, law enforcement sources tell abc news, the surviving suspect has confessed to his role in the bombings. he claims he and his brother were defending islam. saying he and his brother were motivated by the online teachings of al qaeda leader anwar al awlaki and learned how to make the bombs on the internet. >>> now, to the terror plot targeting a train between new york and canada. the two arrested by canadian authorities are due in court today. officials claim the men have tied to al qaeda in iran. this morning, iran denied any involvement in the plot. allegedly involving derailing a train heading to toronto, potentially killing thousands in the process. >>> the other big story this morning, more rain expected in parts of the midwest, already coping with one of the worst floods on record. a flood barrier south of st. louis is now showing signs of strain. and more rain could be serious trouble in michigan, where the grand river has driven hundreds of people from their homes. sam has a rather brutal forecast in moments. >>> meanwhile, a new warning about teens and prescripti
bombing investigation and border security. kyle law? >> reporter: dave, homeland security secretary napolitano says her department is very much still involved with the ongoing investigation in boston. napolitano says homeland security wants to know what led up to the boston terror attack and how one of the suspects went off the radar after being interviewed by the fbi. some senators are demanding answers to national security questions surrounding the boston bombings before moving forward with immigration reform. others argue criminals could be brought out of the shadows. when it comes to border security, napolitano says the number of agents patrolling. the bodder has more than doubled since 2005. >> two major drivers across that southwest border are labor and the fact that it takes so long to get a legal visa. >> reporter: she argues the bipartisan immigration bill proposed last week would help with the employment verification process and from her people to find work here. the entire senate has to consider the legislation. that's not expected until june. meanwhile the house of repre
in connection with the attack. abc's dan harris is in boston. >> reporter: law enforcement sources tell abc news the young man seen on the surveillance tape, calmly walking through the crowd with a bomb in his bag, is now being cooperative with investigators. he has trouble speaking because of gunshot wounds to his neck, but he is communicating through writing, nodding his head and making short vocalizations. based on what he has told them, investigators are now convinced there are no more ongoing plots. and abc news has learned dzhokhar tsarnaev told investigators they learned to build a bomb on the internet. dzhokhar tsarnaev was officially charged with using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction. the complaint contains vivid new details about the chaotic events of last thursday night when the brothers tsarnaev allegedly carjacked a man. the victim describes one of the brothers getting in the car and saying, did you hear about the boston explosion? i did that. the victim says the brother then removed a magazine from his gun, displayed a bullet and said, i am serious. the victim la
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15